POTTERY

 

“Ve n’è talvolta di un colore straordinario, con una vernice speciale che dà una patina singolare. Mi è capitato, tanto questa vernice trae in inganno, di crederle di bronzo o di rame brunito.”

Gaston Vuillier (1891)

Sardinian pottery, and Sardinian handicraft in general, became popular on a national level following the end of the Great War. Sardinian pottery reflects the culture of the Island in an amazing manner; fruit of a simple society, it alternates the plainness of forms and colours for some objects with an extraordinary richness and vividness for others, up to reaching peaks of absolute artistic perfection such as in the case of the “Brocca della Sposa” (Bride’s Jug).

Today pottery techniques draw models and forms inherited from the Spanish domination, like the plates finely decorated with animal patterns, such as the Lapwing, the true symbol of Sardinian handicraft.

SARDINIAN POTTERY

  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica
  • Ceramica

CORK

"We use cork to create something really unique, something that sinks into our roots and with which we are intimately bound up."

The cork oak is a typical tree of the Mediterranean scrub. Imposing and majestic, its main characteristic is that it has a double bark composed of millions of resinous cells which form layers year by year. Cork is a material with unique properties, thanks to which it has been used for a large number of purposes from time immemorial.

Artigianato Pasella, surrounded by vast oak forests, is situated in the heart of cork’s homeland, in Calangianus, which can proudly consider itself the capital of cork.

cork crafting

  • Sughero
  • Sughero
  • Sughero
  • Sughero
  • Sughero
  • Sughero

KNIVES

Sardinia is a land rich in metalliferous deposits, which have been exploited ever since the Nuragic period for the production of cutting tools aimed at making life easier for shepherd and farmers. The passage from simple tool to actual jewel took time but has completely come true. Talking of “Sardinian knife” in fact means talking of true works of art.

Pattadese

The “pattadese” (meaning “from Pattada”, a Sardinian town) is characterized by 4 elements: blade, bolster, handle and rivets. The blade, which is traditionally forged from steel, finds its maximum expression in the gorgeous damask blades; it has a slender and lengthened shape which makes it similar to a myrtle leaf. The bolster is the metal ring that connects the blade to the handle; it can be made of different types of metal including silver and gold, and thanks to its fine decorations it is often considered a true jewel itself. The handle of the pattadese is traditionally formed by two “little cheeks” made of ram or cow bone.

Arburesa

The “arburesa” (from the town of Arbus) is characterized by a typical bay leaf blade with a sharp half-moon shaped point, originally designed to facilitate sheepshearing. The handle of the traditional arburesa is “monolithic”, meaning that it is composed of a single bone, of ram, mouflon or cow, which is secured to the blade through a very robust pin. The original arburesa did not provide for the use of a bolster as the one-piece handle did not need to be further secured to the blade.

Guspinesa

The “guspinesa” (from the town of Guspini) is characterized by a sharpened blade, a thick and finely decorated bolster, a one-piece handle and a central pin which secures the blade to the rest of the knife.


Fabrics

The production of traditional textiles in Sardinia still follows the rhythms and techniques imposed by centuries of history. Today tapestries, carpets, blankets and tablecloths that represent typical examples of pastoral and rural life, are considered true masterpieces of Sardinian Arte Povera (Poor Art).

La lavorazione del ricamo è molto importante e merita senz’altro di essere annoverata fra i capolavori dell’artigianato sardo. Basti pensare alla raffinatissima tradizione nella lavorazione del lino a Buraschi, ai famosi filet realizzati su grandi telai mobili a Bosa, o ancora agli splendidi scialli di Oliena, autentici gioielli caratterizzati da elaboratissimi ricami in oro su motivi floreali.

sardinian fabrics

  • Tessuti
  • Tessuti
  • Tessuti
  • Tessuti
  • Tessuti
  • Tessuti

JEWELS

Sardinian artisans are masters of jewellery art. They masterfully mould gold, silver and coral, skilfully integrating traditional patterns and style with fresh and modern forms.

One of the most renowned jewels is the Sardinian wedding ring, the filigree engagement ring in which small golden pearls are arranged in clusters, as a genuine good omen for fertility and love. The Sardinian button is another traditional jewel which enriches the Sardinian costume, symbol of fertility, finely made with gold and silver, often enriched with semiprecious stones or coral, used to close waistcoats or for shirt sleeves. The “Cocco” (“Coconut”) is a small onyx amulet having two refined silver ends. Usually it was given as a present for the baptism of a newborn child. In fact its role consisted, once tied close to the cradle, in absorbing the evil eye. According to tradition the Cocco would break once it has absorbed all the negative energies existing inside its possessor.

sardinian jewels


wood

Woodwork has always held great importance for Sardinian handicraft. The precious traditional productions, mainly meant for interior and rustic fittings, have their roots in the rural and domestic nature of the Sardinian people. The carvings, engravings and decorations on Sardinian wooden furniture are examples of how “poor art” can rise to a lofty level.

wood crafting